Tag: Family

 

Make These 3 Money Moves to Protect Your Family in 2019

With a new year comes new goals. A new year is also an ideal time to reevaluate your financial situation. Whether you are looking to pay off debt, increase your savings, or create a new budget, there are plenty of ways to improve your financial situation in 2019.

But here’s an often overlooked financial consideration that you should take into account: insurance. Security is absolutely priceless, and you never know when tragedy can strike. Are you and your family prepared?

As we move toward 2019, take the time to research insurance options to protect you and your family, To get started, here are three essential money moves to position yourself for potential emergencies and life challenges.

1. Get term life insurance

No matter who you are or what your financial situation is, life insurance is important.

According to the Life Happens 2018 Barometer survey, over 35 percent of households would feel financial impact within one month if the primary wage earner passed away. But, according to the same survey, only three in five people have their own life insurance policy or a policy through their job.

And that’s not all. According to the Life Insurance and Market Research Association, it appears that even those who do have life insurance feel insecure with their overall coverage level. Nearly 40 percent of Americans state that they wish their spouse or significant other had more life insurance coverage. In addition, more than half of married millennials would like more life insurance coverage for their spouses or partners, according to the same survey.

Where to start? Think about purchasing term life insurance. This type of insurance is relatively inexpensive for most families. It’s also easy to understand. In a nutshell, term life insurance provides coverage for an agreed-upon period – or term – of time. For example, if you should pass away during your policy period, your insurance company pays out the benefit to your designated beneficiaries. With term life insurance, you choose how long you want your policy to last. Common term lengths are 10, 20, or 30 years. Also important to note: Once the term is over, the policy expires. Yet, for an affordable price, term life insurance provides peace of mind and a financial security blanket for your family.

TIP: Check out Ladder

If you don’t currently have term life insurance, there many ways to purchase it, including through life insurance companies and insurance comparison sites. One option is the term life insurance company Ladder. Ladder makes life insurance easy because you can apply for it directly online without having to deal with insurance brokers. Ladder offers life insurance at affordable rates with a price lock guarantee. And, best of all, it only takes five minutes to apply to get insured!

2. Purchase renters or homeowners insurance

Tragedy can strike home at any time. Are you prepared?

You never know when a pipe could unexpectedly break, or your neighbor sets off the sprinkler system in your apartment building, ruining everything. Be prepared and protect yourself and your loved ones by getting homeowners or renters insurance today.

TIP: Check out Lemonade

For starters, check out Lemonade, a new type of renters and homeowners insurance that prides itself on transparent payment options and quick payment of claims. Renters insurance rates start at just $5 per month, and $25 a month for homeowners insurance. Plus, any money that you pay that doesn’t get funneled into claims will be donated to a charity of your choice. Pretty sweet (no lemonade pun intended!)

Lemonade currently offers renters, condo, and homeowners insurance in New York, California, Illinois, New Jersey, Nevada, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Arizona, Michigan, Connecticut, and Washington D.C. They offer renters and condo insurance in Texas and Rhode Island, and renters insurance only  in Iowa, Wisconsin, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon, and Arkansas. Additional states and coverages are rolling out every year.

3. Don’t forget auto insurance

Bad things happen to car owners all of the time – and it can cost you an arm and a leg, even if you are not at fault. Even one small accident, like getting rear-ended, can cost you thousands of dollars if you don’t have the appropriate insurance.

Fortunately, car insurance can put your mind at ease during or after an accident. It can also be expensive. In fact, the average annual cost of car insurance paid in the United States was more than $941 in 2018, according to a study by ValuePenguin. And, depending on where you live, your state could be one of the more costly ones. Louisiana takes the medal for the state with the highest car insurance rate, costing insured residents an average of $152 a month. That’s $1,824 a year – ouch!

TIP: Check out Root

Luckily, insurance companies like Root are on a mission to make car insurance more cost-effective. Instead of just basing your rate on your driving record, Root uses an app to track your driving. Your real-time driving habits then determine your rate. If you are a responsible driver, you’ll receive a better quote. Because of this, you can save as much as 52 percent on car insurance with Root.

Give yourself the gift of security

You certainly can’t put a price-tag on security. You also shouldn’t have to spend a ton of dough to feel financially stable. So, this year, save money and protect yourself and your loved ones by making sure you have insurance.

 

Money Manners: Should you Stage a Money Intervention for Your Family?

Talking about money with trusted pals and your boo may be hard enough. But, envisioning a holiday sit-down for a mature pow-wow with your family over finances? Well, that may feel like a far-fetched, unicorn scenario.

But, what should you do if you have a relative who is royally screwing up his finances, especially if you know this mess may have a ripple effect on other loved ones? You may need to step in and intervene.

Take a look at our tips for determining whether you should stage a money intervention with the fam bam during the holidays, and our shortlist on how to proceed.

Assess the Gravity of the Situation

Communicating about money matters is well, extremely complicated. Add to the mix deep-rooted resentment, history and family dynamics, and you may feel like you’re precariously tip-toeing over landmines.

To gauge whether you should set up a money intervention, figure out exactly how serious the matter is. Is someone committing an act of financial infidelity, such as running up credit card debt, hiding bank accounts, or keeping a huge sum of student loan debt under wraps from a significant other? Or, maybe you have a teenage cousin who has no idea how to manage her finances and constantly spends everything she has. This can turn ugly once she hits college.

If it’s a serious matter, think about what would happen if nobody stepped in to intervene. If doing nothing can lead to debilitating, long-term consequences, a money intervention may be in order.

Figure Out If It’s Appropriate to Stage an Intervention

On the flipside, let’s say your sister has been complaining about how her money habits don’t align with her boyfriend’s. Perhaps she’s a saver and he never puts enough in a savings account. This would perhaps be considered a minor “flare-ups” and may be better handled between the two of them. While you feel inclined—or may have even been asked —to have a “little talk” with the couple, it may heighten feelings of tension and cause resentment.

Don’t be afraid to set boundaries around the types of money matters you’re comfortable discussing with your relatives. And, perhaps you can simply suggest resources or a money management app that can help them with some of the issues they’re facing. Maybe this is all that’s needed to point your family members in the right direction.

Determine If You’re the Right Person

Let’s say that you’ve looked at the facts at hand, and determined that a money intervention is appropriate. If that’s a given, it’s time to decide whether you are the right person to facilitate this type of discussion.

Ideally, the facilitator should be an unbiased person who can remain calm throughout the intervention. Maybe a family friend who knows both parties would better suited. Or, you may want to bring in an experienced, trained professional, such as a financial therapist. Someone like this has no emotional ties to your family and may be the best person for the job.

If you’re the one handling the intervention, here are a few dos and don’ts to get started:

Don’t: Make Assumptions

Most of the time you only know one side of the story. For example, you may only hear from your Uncle Bill about how his wife Jane neglects to pay the bills on time. But to be fair, you may not have gotten wind from your Aunt Jane that Bill is no money saint, either.

It’s tough to do, but leave your assumptions at the door. Go into the situation with an open mind, and get the facts and details from everyone involved. If you take an unbiased, balanced perspective, you can then stage a more effective intervention.

Do: Time It Well

Just like it’s a major faux paus to ask for a loan during someone’s birthday party (yes, I’ve been guilty of this), a holiday gathering is not be the best time to stage a money intervention.

Instead, choose a time that works for everyone involved, and pick a private space so you can discreetly discuss touchy matters.

While the holidays are one of the few times during the year when all your family members may be in the same place, avoid discussing money matters over the dinner table. If you must have an intervention the day of a holiday gathering, schedule it before or after the festivities in a separate location.

Don’t: Go for the Jugular

While you may know what the main issue is, consider starting out by having a general conversation about money. This can lead into deep-seated matters, such as financial infidelity, debts that have remained long unpaid, issues with gambling or bouts of overspending.

The key here is to harbor healthy and respectful communication. Otherwise, it can escalate into a shouting match and reflexive rounds of pointing and blaming.

Do: Defer to a Professional If Necessary

As I mentioned above, it may be easier to bring in a pro, such as a licensed therapist or maybe even a money coach who works with couples or groups.

A money intervention can cause tension, and dredge up deep-seated, bad feelings. Without proper training, a well-intended conversation can quickly go south.

Handle the Situation Gently

When trying to decide whether staging a money intervention is appropriate and necessary, just keep this in mind: For every action, there is a reaction.

Do your best to create a safe space before bringing out the elephant in the room. And whatever you do, tread with care. If executed properly, facilitating a family financial intervention can shift your family’s money situation in a positive direction. It can also foster deeper communication and trust.

 

6 Money Lessons Your Parents Taught You That Were Plain Wrong

Earlier this year, my partner and I were at the tide pools at a beach in Southern California. As we peered into the shallow pools with burgeoning ocean flora and fauna, we were joined by a mom and her two kids.

“Look at the clams!” she said, examining a cluster of shelled sea creatures on the side of a rock. “They’re mussels, not clams!” my partner said, correcting her.

The point of this story: Parents try to educate their kids, yet sometimes they inadvertently steer them wrong. And, whether you like it or not, your parents served as your first role models when it came to life and money lessons. As a result, you may have picked up some incorrect money messages from your parents and other family members. As you grew up, these money lessons became ingrained in you and may have turned into not-so-healthy money habits.

Take a look at some common money lessons that you may have learned from your parents – and why they need to be debunked right now.

Talking About Money Is Taboo

Growing up, Alex Whitehouse learned that money is private and personal, and therefore considered to be a taboo topic.

Reality Check: By all means it’s important to discuss money matters. That’s how we learn how to make better decisions.

“I had to learn about money through trial and error,” says Whitehouse, the founder of FinHealthy.com. “I made mistakes and had to dig myself out of debt, repair my credit, and learn to save.”

Talking about money helps you develop a better relationship with your money. It also helps foster honest communication with those you love.

“Discussing personal finance with friends, relatives, and colleagues can help you learn and avoid mistakes. It helps you become comfortable and confident in your finances, and it can inspire others to do the same.” says Whitehouse.

We Were Poor, and You Will Be Too

Maybe your parents had the attitude that they were never rich, and this means you’ll never be wealthy either. Perhaps they think life is an endless grind, and it’s pointless to dream about wealth and financial independence.

For Jaime Donovan, this came as a surprise because her parents taught her a lot of things about money —how to write a check, open a savings account and save for emergencies. They also taught her how to pay for used or new cars with cash, and how to avoid debt.

Reality Check: Donovan wishes her parents went beyond the basics and taught her that it’s absolutely possible to build wealth.

“For some reason, in their minds, they thought that it was impossible to become wealthy,” says Donovan, a blogger at Young Modern Money.

“I’m happy to say that they’ve changed their attitude about this, but it took years for them to come to an understanding that normal people can build wealth.”

Yes, normal people can certainly build wealth. It starts with understanding what wealth is and that building wealth is about growing your net worth, not accumulating material possessions. More importantly, financial independence is not just about how much money you earn, but what you do with that money.

Money Is a Source of Pain

Perhaps your mom told you that nobody likes their job, and that earning money would be a grind.

This was the case for Evan Sutherland. “With all the bills and all the expenses that come up, my parents taught me that it’s going to feel as though you can never make enough money,” says Sutherland, co-founder of Budgeting Couple.

Reality Check: When Sutherland and his wife started out together and began earning an income, they were pleasantly surprised by how simple money was to manage.

“We always had enough money to pay the bills and buy the things we wanted,” says Sutherland. “How? We used a budget to spend less than we earned, every month. By spending less than we earned, we never experienced money stress, we were happy to pay our bills, and we loved spending money!”

I experienced the same thing. When I started making my own money and learned to create a spending plan, I turned frugality into a fun game. I also used apps to help me track and save money, experiencing very few problems saving a portion of my paychecks.

Never Spend More Than You Need To

My father is the ultimate cheapster. And while he definitely has no problem socking away money, he still buys the absolute cheapest item on the list. No matter what it is. No matter how much joy a fancier option might bring him.

Reality Check: “Sometimes it makes sense to spend the least,” says Jim Wang, the founder of Wallet Hacks. On the other hand: “Sometimes it makes sense to pay more for higher quality, better service, or some other reason outside the item itself.”

I would gladly pay more for a set of tires, and this past year I splurged in a pricey pair of leather boots, trench coat, and so forth. But these are items I value, use a lot, and really enjoy. And I was able to afford each of them.

Talking About Money Is Impolite

It’s imperative to talk about money. You talk about money when you ask for a discount, or when you ask for a raise at work. And you talk about it when you budget with your spouse.

You can also do this when you set financial goals by sharing those goals with others – maybe even asking people you care about to hold you accountable.

Reality Check: You know what is impolite? When you don’t talk about money. Because when you don’t learn about financial problems that your friends and family are dealing with, how can you help them? And, if you’re a freelancer or work for yourself, how do you know what’s considered a competitive rate from clients if you don’t discuss this with colleagues in the same field?

No Need to Worry About Your Credit Score

Maybe your parents were cash-focused and told you to pay your bills on time and everything will be fine. Or, perhaps they told you to keep a balance on your credit cards in order to build credit, or that closing a card won’t impact your score (the truth: it really depends).

Reality Check: Yikes. Sure you won’t have to worry about your credit score if you pay for everything in cash. Otherwise, your credit score is a huge part of your life as a consumer. You’ll need a solid score to finance a car or house, get the best terms and rates on credit cards, or to get financing for a new business endeavor.

Be Your Own Money Teacher

While your parents had the best intentions, it’s important to be your own money teacher. By understanding these money myths, you can start to form healthy money habits and reach your financial goals. Remember: It’s your life, not your parents’. Are you ready to create your own successful money story?

 

How to Save on Utilities (and Still Have Fun) Over the Holidays

How to Save on Utilities (and Still Have Fun) Over the Holidays

The holidays are all about spending quality time with those you care about and spreading good cheer.

There’s just one little snag. Between stringing up lights, baking your favorite holiday treats and turning up the heat to fight off the winter chill, your utility bills can easily skyrocket. This may leave your bank account feeling the pinch, especially when you’re also spending money on things like gifts, entertainment and holiday travel.

In fact, the average person plans to spend $1,250 on holiday-related expenses, according to PwC’s 2018 Holiday Outlook. What to do? As you head into the holidays, try these tips to help you lower your utility costs.

Go LED for Holiday Lighting

Instead of sticking with your traditional outdoor holiday lights, consider making the switch to LED this year. Compared to regular incandescent bulbs, LED lights use at least 75% less energy, which means a lower electric bill for you.

“Set the lights on a timer, that way it’s one less thing on your plate,” says Sara Skirboll, shopping and trend expert at coupon and deal site RetailMeNot.

You can also use LED lights to save money inside your home when you’re hosting holiday get-togethers.

Arthur Smith, editor of LEDwatcher.com, a solar and LED lighting blog, says smart LED bulbs can save you money and set the mood for holiday entertaining.

“Smart LED bulbs are extremely versatile, because you can not only change the color of the light they emit, but also the intensity of the light, and when hosting a holiday party, bright lights aren’t always the best way to go,” he says.

And, here’s another pro tip: Skirboll says you can always skip the lights altogether and use candles for interior lighting.

“You get the same glow but at no additional cost to you, a win-win situation,” she says.

If you plan to do this, just make sure you are familiar with basic candle safety rules so holiday celebrations don’t turn into a fire hazard.

Invest in a Programmable Thermostat

Managing utility costs over the holidays and the winter months can be tough if you’re dealing with fluctuating temperatures or entertaining more often.

Josh Savage, owner of Hero Heating, Plumbing & Cooling in Minneapolis, Minnesota, says installing a programmable thermostat is one of the best ways to save on heating costs. You can set the thermostat to turn the heat down automatically at night or during the day when you’re at work or doing your holiday shopping.

Programmable thermostats can cost between $20 and $150, while smart models that connect to your smartphone can run upwards of $300. If you don’t have the cash in savings to swing it, try to get into the habit of turning the heat down before you go to bed or head out for the day.

Savage has a bonus tip for saving on utility costs during the holidays: “Turn the thermostat down before any holiday gatherings or parties.”

This works particularly well if you have people coming over and you’ll be doing a lot of cooking that generates heat, he says.

“Oftentimes people will end up opening a window to cool things back off, and that can be a waste of heat and money,” says Savage.

Use Smart Power Strips

If you’re plugging your Christmas tree and holiday lights into a power strip, consider upgrading to smart versions to save on utility costs.

“Most electronics use electricity even when they’re turned off,” says Jill Caponera, consumer savings expert at PromoCodes.com.

This creates a “vampire load” effect, which adds up to an average cost of $200 per year.

“Smart power strips turn off the power to electronics when they’re not in use, and can be set to turn off at specific times or during times of inactivity,” Caponera says.

Opt for Potluck When Planning Holiday Meals

Matthias Alleckna, an energy industry analyst and creator of energy cost comparison site Energyrates.ca, says that if you’re planning a holiday dinner, make it a group effort.

“The less time you spend cooking, the more money you save,” since you’re not running your stove, oven or other appliances as often, says Alleckna.

To make coordinating potluck dinners easier, use an app like Perfect Potluck or Meal Train to keep track of who’s bringing what. If you need to reimburse anyone for last-minute purchases, like a couple of bottles of wine or extra napkins, you can use the “Pay Friends” feature through your Chime mobile banking app to pay them back.

Simply log into your Chime app, select the “Move Money” tab, click “Transfers” and select “Pay Friends”. Plug in your friend’s name, phone number or email, the amount you want to send and complete the transfer.

Know Your Peak Energy Hours

Your electric company may rate your energy use differently throughout the day, so check with your utility company to see if they have a time-of-use schedule, says Sophie Kaemmerle, neighborhood expert for background check platform Neighbor Who.

You may be charged more for energy during peak hours so it pays to know when the cheapest times of day are.

“Most utility companies offer discounts if you run major appliances, like washers, dryers and dishwashers at off hours,” Kaemmerle says.

Typically off hours are after 7 p.m. This means that waiting until after dark to turn on holiday lights, do the laundry or bake up a batch of gingerbread cookies can help you save money on your electric bill.

Spread the Energy Savings

While you’re cutting down your own energy use over the holidays, give your friends and family a hand as well by purchasing energy-efficient gifts, says Alleckna. If you’re not sure whether a gift is energy-efficient, check for the Energy Star sticker. You can find it on things like computers, appliances, DVD players, TVs and phones.

“Energy Star-rated products use up to 60% less energy than standard ones, which can represent a lot of money at the end of the day,” says Neighbor Who’s Kaemmerle.

Bank on Lower Utility Costs During the Holidays

High utility bills can lead to a holiday hangover and that’s not how you want to start off the new year.

Using one (or all) of these tips in your daily routine can help you cut down on your energy usage during the holidays and beyond. And remember: The more money you save on energy, the more cash you’ll have to spend on holiday fun.

 

10 Ways To Save Money Now For 2018 Holiday Shopping Season

The holiday shopping season is rapidly approaching and this may leave you feeling just a tad bit stressed about everything you need to buy. With a mounting list of gifts for your partner, your nieces and nephews, and of course, those white elephant presents for the company holiday party – it’s enough to make your head spin.

“How can I afford all this?” you may wonder. One way to ease the stress is to sock money away now for your holiday shopping. Here are 10 ways to start saving money today.

1. Automate your savings

Don’t rely on willpower alone to get you started. Instead, automate your savings and set up automatic withdrawals from your checking account to your savings account. This way you’ll grow your savings account every time you get paid. Even if it’s just $20 a month, this will still help you boost your savings. Plus, if you’re a Chime member you can automatically save 10 percent after every payday, and you can save even more by taking advantage of Chime’s round up program.

2. Create a budget

A lot of overspending and holiday debt happens because consumers haven’t created a budget and adequately prepared for the holiday season. So, come up with a holiday shopping budget and work backwards on meeting that goal. For example, if you need to save $1,000 and have two months to do this, try to save $500 per month.

3. Use coupons

Before you buy anything, you should always check to see if there are any coupons you can use to lower the price. But don’t worry, you don’t need to scour the newspaper and get out the scissors! You can use Honey, a program that automatically applies coupons to your online shopping cart. You can also check out sites like RetailMeNot to find coupons and deals.

4. Look for holiday bargains

During the holiday shopping season, retailers often tout great deals and sales. You can check out sites like UncommonGoods.com, Overstock.com and OrientalTrading.com for some sweet holiday deals, as well as unique gift ideas. For other sites, it can pay to do your research ahead of time to see what holiday bargains you can score. A little research can go a long way to helping you save money!

5. Cut out one thing

One of the best ways to save money is to eliminate something from your budget. If you’re saving money for holiday shopping, you may think you need to take drastic measures. But that’s not realistic and can backfire! Instead, focus on one thing you can cut out until the holidays roll around. For example, can you give up Starbucks from now until the holidays? Can you go on a restaurant ban until Christmas? Find something in your budget that is a “want” and cut it out. It’s only temporary. This will free up some money for you to spend on your gifts.

6. Save on shipping

Shopping online can certainly make your life easier. But shipping costs can add up quickly. Before buying anything online, check out sites like RetailMeNot to see if there are free shipping codes available. Of course, you don’t want to spend extra money just to get free shipping, but if you have a large shopping list, these free shipping codes make sense.

7. Use cash or your debit card

After creating a budget for your holiday shopping, this will give you a sense of how much you can afford to spend. In order to stick to this budget, consider using cash or a debit card when shopping. This way you can avoid holiday debt and spend only what you have available in your bank account.

8. Start early

When you’re rushing and things are last-minute, it’s easy to make mistakes and pay for convenience. Yet, aside from budgeting money, it’s important to budget time too. Going to the mall on December 23rd, for example, can lead to stress and you may end up paying more just so you can quickly get out of the stores. And, if you’re shopping online, you may be forced to pay a lot more for express shipping, instead of paying a fraction of that for standard shipping. So, give yourself the gift of time so you can save money.

9. Put it off the ‘gram

You know all those great group photos you took and put on the ‘gram? Get it off the ‘gram and go to your local Walgreens to print out those photos. You can get an affordable frame and voila: affordable gift. For about $5, I got a photo printed and a frame at the local dollar store and had a cute gift for my family. It was meaningful and a nice keepsake. Remember, sometimes simple is better!

10.  Buy gift cards at a discount

A 2017 survey by the National Retail Federation and Prosper Insights & Analytics found that gift cards continue to be popular gifts. The survey found that 59 percent of consumers planned to give a gift card, and gift card spending was projected to be a whopping $27.6 billion dollars. One of the best tips to save money on gift cards is to buy them at a discount. Check out sites like CardPool.com and Raise.com to score gift cards at discounted rates.

Bottom line

Want some of the best ways to save money during the holidays? Use these 10 tips to help you stay on track. These money saving ideas will help you stick to you budget and avoid holiday debt.

And remember: While the holidays can be stressful, starting to save and prepare now can help you get through the season without the added financial stress.

 

10 Ways to Protect Yourself Against Fraud This Holiday Season

Ah, the holidays: a time for stockings, menorahs, cookies… and fraud?

If you’re not careful, then maybe. And, you certainly don’t want anybody stealing your hard-earned savings. Right?

While Juliana Gruenwald of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) says this time of year “doesn’t necessarily pose a bigger threat,” she admits that the sheer volume of holiday shopping does “present more opportunities for scammers.” During the 2017 holiday shopping season, for example, ACI Worldwide reported one out of every 85 e-commerce transactions was a fraudulent attempt — an increase of 22% over the previous year.

What to do? To ensure this holiday season is full of cheer rather than chicanery, take these 10 steps today.

1. Update Your Passwords

The time to update your passwords is now – not when you’re in the throes of a Cyber Monday bargain frenzy.

“The most basic — and also most ignored — cybersecurity practice is maintaining strong passwords,” says Idan Udi Edry, CEO of Trustifi.

He urges you to create unique passwords for every site, and to update them every 30 to 90 days. Passwords should never include important names or dates, he says, but rather “a series of random numbers, upper and lowercase letters, and special characters.”

Although this sounds like a hassle, it’s super easy with a password manager like LastPass or 1Password. No more trying to come up with secure passwords you can remember (an oxymoron, if you ask me); LastPass does it for you for free.

2. Turn on 2-Step Verification

Take a few minutes and turn on 2-step verification for major accounts like Google, Facebook, and Apple. You can usually find this option under “security” or “settings.” Once you set it up, the site will require additional verification every time you attempt to sign in from an unfamiliar device.

Edry says a text or call to your phone is more secure than emailed codes or additional security questions. But anything is better than just a password, as he says that even one “additional verification step encourages cybercriminals to switch to an easier target.”

While you’re at it, update your computer and Internet browser, too. And before making any online purchases, make sure the site is secure by looking for “https://” at the beginning of the URL (the “s” stands for secure).

“Cybercriminals seek vulnerabilities in dated software to carry out their attacks,” adds Edry.

 3. Use Your Bank’s Security Features

Although credit cards generally offer more consumer protections than debit cards, you can make debit cards safer by taking advantage of your bank’s security features.

The Chime banking app, for example, allows you to easily block debit card transactions. All you have to do is turn off “allow transactions” or “allow international transactions.” Some users actually keep it that way until they’re about to make a purchase. Since it’s just a quick toggle, it’s easy to switch when waiting in the checkout line.

4. Don’t Save Your Details

I know, I know: It’s a pain to type your card details into every site. But it’s better than getting hacked, right?

“Even if you’re using a site that you trust, keep your details secure,” says Jennifer McDermott, a consumer advocate for finder.com.

“It may be annoying to re-enter it every time you want to make a purchase, but it’s a small price to pay for additional security,” says McDermott.

Taking it a step further, you can also employ a virtual credit card number. These cards serve as proxies for your regular cards by using disposable account numbers. This means if a thief gets ahold of your virtual number, you won’t have to cancel your regular card. Ask your card issuer for more details on this service.

5. Avoid Clicking Links

An email or text arrives from your favorite department store, announcing that everything is 80% off — for today only. Is this an early Kwanzaa gift or what? Though most of us would be tempted to click that link, experts advise proceeding with caution.

“Links or attachments may be infected with malware designed to steal your data,” says Adam Levin, the founder of CyberScout and author of “Swiped.”

“Or they may direct you to a clone website that looks legitimate, where you’re prompted to enter personal information that’s sent to the fraudster,” says Levin.

Even if an email looks real, don’t click the links — and instead go directly to the retailer’s official website. If the deal is legitimate, it’ll be advertised there.

Robert Siciliano, CEO of Safr.Me, says you should also be wary of gift cards that arrive via email. If the card comes with a code that allows you to claim the gift, it might be real — but if it asks for your credit card information, it’s probably a scam. He says typos are a good indicator that there’s something fishy going on.

6. Send Encrypted Emails

Not only should you pay attention to what’s coming in over email; you should also pay attention to what’s going out.

“Consider the types of attachments commonly sent over email,” says Trustifi’s Edry.

“Legal records, driver’s licenses, W4 forms, real estate records, corporate financial records, credit card information, addresses, health records, social security numbers, etc. These sensitive pieces of data and information are exactly what hackers target.”

To keep yourself safe, Edry recommends sending encrypted emails, a service which his company offers. For more email encryption options, check out this article from Consumer Reports.

7. Don’t Shop Over Public Wifi

You’re at an airport or a coffee shop, and even though you know it’s not a good idea, you buy something over the public wifi. You need to get that holiday shopping done, after all!

While we’ve all done it, Edry says this is a big mistake. You should never access your bank account or use a credit card over a public network.

“Only complete those transactions when you’re on a safe network, like your house,” he says. “That includes using any passwords you’re worried a hacker might compromise.”

If you really need to complete a transaction, then use your phone’s hotspot instead of the public wifi. As Edry says: “It won’t be very fast, but it will be more secure.”

8. Watch Out for Job Scams

Whether you’re working at your local UPS or as a mall Santa, getting a holiday side gig is a fantastic way to afford gifts and holiday parties. According to Levin, however, it’s also an easy way to get swindled.

“Beware of work-at-home and mystery shopper ads, as these are usually scams,” says the Cyberscout CEO.

“The key to landing a real seasonal job is to start early, then research the company by going to their website or checking with the BBB. And never give out your Social Security number to unsolicited callers,” says Levin.

9. Use Coupons With Caution

I’m all about using coupon codes and shopping portals to maximize rewards when buying gifts online. But, as Safr.me’s Siciliano says: “If [a coupon is] too good to be true, then it’s too good to be true.”

He says that coupon sites that request personal information, or have typos, poor punctuation, or pop-up windows, should “send you running.”

However, this doesn’t mean avoiding all coupon sites. Personally, I love RetailMeNot and Honey.

10. Monitor Your Accounts

According to a finder.com survey, the majority of fraud victims (54%) didn’t find out their information had been compromised until a retailer declined their card. Not only is that embarrassing and inconvenient, it also means you’ve given a thief plenty of time to rack up charges.

“You can’t rely on your credit card issuer to notice fraudulent behaviour,” says McDermott, who works for the site.

“Make checking your statements a regular habit and ensure you can vouch for every transaction made, even if it’s small. Often thieves will make a small transaction first as a test, and then when it goes unnoticed, a larger one,” says McDermott.

If you notice any suspicious activity, report it immediately to your bank or card issuer. Though you’ll probably need to get a new card, it usually takes no more than a few days to arrive.

Sit Back — and Drink Some Cocoa

While securing your finances and personal information might seem like a lot of work, it’s important to take these steps so that you can minimize your chances of becoming a victim of fraud.

“The holiday season is the season of giving — and also a season for criminals looking to steal your cheer. Be proactive and remember that staying cyber-safe means having a fraud-free holiday!” says Levin of Cyberscout.

 

6 Ways to Reuse Your Halloween Decorations

October is a festive month, especially as neighborhood houses are often decked out with cool Halloween decorations. In fact, maybe you’re that person who goes overboard and creates a scene from the Halloweentown movie in your front lawn.

Yet, even if your idea of Halloween consists of a simple pumpkin on your doorstep, you know that the frightful holiday will likely put a dent in your budget.

So, how can you get by this Halloween season with your savings intact? One thing you can do to get more bang for your buck is to repurpose your Halloween decorations. Here are 6 creative ways to put your Halloween dollars to use all year long.

1. Repurpose Owls

If you have owl decorations for any occasion, you can easily incorporate them into your general home decor instead of just using the items to spook friends and family members around Halloween.

Owl decor can be placed on an end table or ceramic pieces can even go on a bookshelf and serve as bookends.

2. Refill Old Candy Dishes

If you had glass or plastic dishes around the house that were filled with Halloween candy, simply refill them with something else after all the trick-or-treating is finished.

You can refill your jars and dishes with Christmas candy or candy canes. You can even go for a more neutral theme and fill them with colorful beads or pebbles to match your home’s decor. For another idea: Place some fresh or faux flowers or even potpourri inside the dishes.

I like to buy glossy decorative pebbles from craft stores or even the dollar store. It’s an easy, budget-friendly way to spruce up your home decor.

3. Use Your Pumpkins For Indoor Home Decor

If you purchased a few pumpkins for outdoor Halloween decorations, clean them off and bring them inside to create new home decor for fall. Or, leave them outside until Thanksgiving. Pumpkins don’t just signify Halloween. They are also appropriate decor for the fall season. You can even create an autumn scene by placing a pumpkin on top of colorful fall leaves and pinecones. Volia! Free fall decorations!

For more ideas, you can paint over old Halloween themes on your pumpkin, turn your pumpkin into a vase, or use mini pumpkins as centerpieces for Thanksgiving. You can also add a cornucopia to adorn your pumpkin centerpiece.

And, here’s yet another idea: Carve your pumpkin and roast the seeds for a delicious and nutritious snack!

4. Use Hay Bales for Outdoor Displays

Hay bales are commonly used for Halloween decor to house scarecrows, spooky skeletons, or carved pumpkins. But, you can also use them to display other types of outdoor decor on your porch. For example, you can add greenery, mums, or flower pots to reuse the hay bales for outdoor home decor throughout the fall season.

When you’re done decorating with the hay, recycle it by using it to mulch your garden.

5. Candles and Lights Always Come in Handy

Don’t ditch your decorative candles and lights after Halloween. Odds are, you’ll need them in the future. Small candles, whether real or electronic, can be great decoration pieces for your home during the holiday season or even afterwards.

You may even want to use string lights to decorate your child’s bedroom or to put up during a party you’re hosting. If you have colorful lights or even orange and white tea lights, you can still decorate the interior or exterior of your home for Christmas by adding some additional colors. All you need to do is get a little creative.

6. Upcycle Your Plastic Pumpkins or Trick-or-Treat Buckets

Almost everyone has either had or seen those basic plastic pumpkin buckets. Maybe you or your kids have even used them for trick-or-treating.

Instead of just putting them in storage until next year or throwing them away, you can reuse them as storage buckets in your house or upcycle them for home decor by painting the plastic pumpkin buckets a new color or adding fabric to the exterior. See an example here.

You can also use the buckets to help organize your kids’ rooms. For example, perhaps you can use them to store arts and craft items, books or small toys.

Halloween Decor Can Have a Longer Shelf Life

Halloween decor can be fun to buy, but it almost seems like the season flies by too quickly. When you repurpose your Halloween decorations to use in your home throughout the year, you’ll stretch your dollar and get more bang for your buck. Plus, you’ll feel less wasteful if you’re using items more than once a year.

Have you started putting up your Halloween decorations yet? How much did you spend and can you make that spending last throughout the year? Think about it: You can save a ton of money by getting creative and reusing your Halloween decor!

 

Want to Give Back? Here Are Some Ideas for Giving Tuesday

You’ve probably found yourself in this predicament: You want to do more to give back in your community, but the holidays can swallow up your time and savings.

Luckily, you can take advantage of the upcoming Giving Tuesday on November 27 to shake off some of that holiday guilt.  What, exactly, is Giving Tuesday? It’s a global movement, now in its seventh year, that encourages individuals and companies to donate their time and money to worthy causes and organizations.

The #GivingTuesday movement raised $274 million online with more than 150 countries participating in 2017. While this day may only come around once a year, the positive effects last a lot longer. Chime, for example, is participating in the Pledge 1% movement whereby businesses pledge to give back 1% of equity, profit, product, and/or employee time for their communities. Case in point: Chime volunteers assembled 1,300 boxes of non-perishables for the senior community in San Francisco.

Will you join us in making a difference? Take a look at 7 ways you can give back in honor of Giving Tuesday.

1. Shop Smarter

Torn between using your bank account to help humanity and buy gifts for your family? Good news! You don’t have to choose. You can purchase gifts that kick a portion of the price back to charities. For example, Uncommon Goods sells unique gifts from local artisans and gives one dollar of each purchase back to charity. For affordable options, just search the “under $25” gift section for gifts ranging from coffee blends to herb gardens to unusual toys.

2. Donate Money

Interested in giving money to local charities but not sure where to give? To start, think about how you’d best like to make a difference. For example, if you love books and want to spread literacy, a contribution to Worldreader helps fund digital book distribution. Or, if you want your hard-earned dough to help Hurricane Florence victims, The American Red Cross makes donating effortless.

Try forgoing a daily latte or fast food runs and instead donate the money. Your waistline will thank you too.

3. Volunteer

If you don’t have extra money to donate at this time, no worries. You can still make an impact by giving your time. Check your city’s website, the local library or community center to find out about upcoming volunteer opportunities.

Another pro tip: Search VolunteerMatch to find volunteer opportunities that fit your interests and talents. For example, computer pros can discover ways to put their tech skills to use, while animal lovers can volunteer to care for Fido while he waits for adoption.

4. Give Blood

While needles may make you squeamish, donating blood is an easy and impactful way to give back. The whole process takes less than an hour.

The American Red Cross reports that the U.S. needs blood every two seconds. One donation can potentially save three lives.

5. Be a Good Neighbor

Look around. Sometimes the greatest needs are right in front of you. For example, perhaps you can bring in trash cans for busy families or elderly neighbors. Or, ask a new mom in your apartment building if you can bring her a meal or babysit.

Don’t know your neighbors? Now might be a good time to become acquainted. Make a goal to bring a plate or package of cookies to one neighbor’s home and introduce yourself.

6. Small Acts of Kindness

This is an easy and inexpensive way to give back.

If your day starts with a morning coffee run, pay for the coffee for the person behind you in line. Here are a couple of other ideas: Leave a simple note saying, “You are amazing. Have a good day!” on someone’s car, or buy lunch for your co-worker who is too busy to eat.

While you’re at it, remember to look up from your routine to notice life around you and think about how you can make a small difference in someone’s day.

7. Be the Motivator

You don’t need to do #GivingTuesday alone. Recruit your friends, family, or co-workers to make the day more fun. Run a marathon for charity together. Serve food in a group at a local shelter. 

Helping out is contagious. When you motivate others to participate, you stay encouraged too. By getting together with friends or colleagues, you also get to catch up during the busy season and connect on a deeper level.

Why not chat about what’s new in your life while assembling necessities for those in need? Or get to know a co-worker better while wrapping presents for underprivileged children.

Why #GivingTuesday?

We get it: You are busy and stressed about the upcoming the holidays. How in the world are you supposed to find the extra time or funds to participate in #GivingTuesday? It’s not easy, but it will be worth it. Think of this globally-celebrated day as a way to take a breather from your to-do list.

And remember: Helping someone else is not only good for the community. It’s good for you. It allows you to take a pause in your daily life and experience the joy of a more connected world.

 

Halloween Costumes From Your Favorite Books

Do store-bought Halloween costume prices send you screaming in fear? If so, the DIY route might be for you.

By now you may be thinking: How can you scare up a unique and affordable costume? Luckily, we’ve got a bright idea for you: Dress up as your favorite literary figure. This will make you look smart and boost your savings – double win!

Here are 14 affordable, literary-inspired costume ideas, broken down by categories. Book lovers everywhere can now rejoice!

Well-Loved Children’s Books

An excellent children’s book never goes out of style. These kid-lit faves make perfect costume choices:

1. The mouse from If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Numeroff.

This one is easy as the main thing you need to imitate the lovable mouse from Numeroff’s series is a pair of overalls. You can then make mouse ears by gluing grey paper or felt semi-circles to a headband. If you have long hair you can also put your hair into two top buns for ears. Then, make a giant cookie with construction paper or carry around a bag of cookies.

You can also make it a family affair by dressing up as characters from the author’s other books. For example, you can dress as a pig and take along a box of pancake mix, or dress up as a dog carrying donuts.

2. Camilla Cream from A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon.

Camilla Cream is plagued with rainbow stripes after trying too hard to fit in with her peers. To create your own Camilla Cream, you’ll need to cover your face, neck, and arms with different colored paint stripes (make sure you get body paint!) From there, wear a black dress or shirt to make your rainbow skin pop.

3. Amelia Bedelia from Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish.

If you don’t have a maid’s costume hanging around, a black dress and rectangle-shaped piece of white lace will do. Adorn a black hat with faux daisies and then seal the deal by carrying around a fake chicken or a string of green beans.

4. Harold from Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson.

For this easy costume, all you need to do is draw a creative scene with purple marker on a white shirt. Then, walk around holding the purple crayon. Nailed it!

5. Ms. Frizzle from the Magic School Bus series by Joanna Cole.

Ah, Ms. Frizzle: The science teacher we all wish we had! To transform into Ms. Frizzle, all you need to do is tease your hair or wear a big, bright orange wig. Then, pick a science theme and tape pictures relating to that theme to a dress and leggings.

YA Favorites

Young adult books may be promoted as a teenage category, but let’s be honest. You probably geek out on the following characters more than your younger cousins. Take a look:

6. Harry Potter from the namesake Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling.

Did you really think we could put this list together and leave off Harry Potter? The classic circle glasses, lightning scar, and stick wand can all be yours for an affordable price. You can even use a black graduation robe (check the thrift store or borrow one from a recent grad). Voila! You’re Harry Potter!

7. Count Olaf and others from A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket.

You can expect more love for your Lemony Snicket-inspired costumes this year thanks to the Netflix mini-series. There are so many interesting characters to choose from. For example, slap on a mustache and wrap a stuffed snake around your shoulders to become Uncle Monty.

Of course, Count Olaf provides enough costume ideas himself. For bonus points, don’t forget to sing out: “I’m handsome and I’m talented and love your bank account.”

8. Characters from The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins.

Yes, you can become Katniss by rocking a bow and arrow as well as a dress that looks like fire. However, dressing up as Effie Trinket is where the real fun is at. From her ever-changing wigs and outlandish outfits, there are many looks to choose from. May the odds be ever in your favor.

9. Become an Ugly from The Uglies trilogy by Scott Westerfeld.

For this costume idea, focus your efforts on your makeup with a flash tattoo from the Uglies trilogy. Tally Youngblood’s tattoo may be the most fun to replicate. She has Celtic swirls above her eye.

Adult Books

Love to read? Take a look at a few of our favorite literary costume ideas – inspired by popular adult books.

10. Lisbeth Salander from The Girl with The Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson.

Can you be any cooler than Lisbeth Salander? Luckily you can become her by coloring your hair black (if it’s not already black naturally) and slicking it back. Then, dress in black skinnies and a black jacket, and don’t go light on the fake tattoos, piercings, and metal jewelry.

11. Jane Bennet from Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith.

Can’t choose between awesome period clothing and zombie makeup? You can have both if you dress as the undead Jane Bennet. Splatter red paint over a white regent-style dress, pin up your hair, and paint on your zombie face. You’re good to go!

12. Frodo Baggins from Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien.

The Lord of the Rings trilogy is another classic series with so much costume inspiration to draw from. Frodo Baggins may be the easiest and cheapest to pull off. You’ll need a brown cape, a ring on a chain, and furry feet. For the cape, you can tie brown cloth or a brown towel over your shoulders. For furry feet, glue sections of a wig to flip-flops.

13. Fifty Shades of Grey from the namesake book Fifty Shades of Grey by E. L. James.

This costume is always good for a laugh. All you have to do is dress in grey tones and attach grey paint swatches to your outfit. Handcuffs are optional.

14. The old man from The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway.

For this literary-inspired costume, you can take a trip into your dad or grandfather’s closet for some fashion choices. Add a white wig, facial hair and cane. You are now a literary genius. You’re welcome.

Be Inspired by Your Favorite Books

If none of these ideas suit your fancy, then be inspired by your favorite book. Look for ways to dress up as the title character. Or, if the book’s main characters have been overdone, try going for another character. Whatever you do, have fun with it. And, remember: By being a little creative, you’ll save a lot of money. What’s not to like about that? Happy Halloween!

 

14 Part-Time Jobs That Provide Health Insurance

Being self-employed, I’m sensitive to the health insurance dilemma millions of people have to deal with.

My family is getting our coverage through MediShare, a Christian health sharing ministry. It’s working well for us, and I strongly recommend it. But there are other ways to get health insurance coverage, if you aren’t participating in an employer plan, or you can’t afford coverage on the health insurance exchanges.

This strategy might be a solution if you’re:

  • In between jobs
  • Self-employed
  • Or in early retirement (no employer plan, but too young for Medicare)

It’s well worth investigating if you’re in one of those three career categories. It may seem like a less-than-perfect solution for health insurance, but there actually are people getting coverage this way.

14 Part-time Jobs that Provide Health Insurance

I recently came across a great article (from Personal Finance expert Kevin Mercadante): 20 Part-time Jobs with Health Insurance that served as the inspiration for this piece.

This list is current as of June 2018. But please be sure to double check each benefit offer before applying for a job. Employers are particularly fluid when it comes to offering health insurance to their part-time employees.

Some drop coverage or change the terms, while others add it, and it all happens on a pretty regular basis.

1. Starbucks

I’m starting with this one because it’s the most frequently mentioned among any time the topic involves health insurance for part-timers. Starbucks runs largely with part-time workers, and they’ve been providing them with health insurance for years. They do it through their program called Your Special Blend. It’s a benefits package that not only provides health insurance, but also other benefits, including dental and vision.

To qualify, you must work at least 240 hours in a three consecutive month period. That works out to be at least 20 hours per week. Their website confirms they pay 70% of the premiums for their employees, and also cover 100% of preventative medicine.

One of the advantages of Starbucks as a source of group health insurance is that they’re located in virtually every nook and cranny in the United States. That means there may be a job available close to where you live.

2. UPS

This is another company that frequently appears on lists of part-time jobs that provide health insurance. And since it’s a package delivery company, they have locations across the country. UPS is a company well known for providing full-time benefits for their part-time employees.

For union jobs, which likely takes in the vast majority of delivery personnel, you must work at least 400 hours over three months. That works out to be something like 25 hours per week. That will give you full-time benefits.

If you work between 225 and 400 hours over three months, you’ll be eligible for part-time benefits, which includes health insurance. They don’t give details, but it’s likely to be a stripped-down program. Still, you can qualify by working fewer than 15 hours per week.

UPS may not be your first choice if you’re looking for group health insurance coverage. The work is physically challenging, and you have to be there for a minimum of one year to be eligible.

3. Delta Airlines

This one really surprised me, but in a good way. As one of the largest airlines, they operate out of most commercial airports across the country. If you live close to an airport, this could be a serious option. Not only that, working for an airline brings outstanding travel benefits. Delta is also one of those companies where a job that starts out as part time could go full-time, if that’s a consideration.

Delta provides health insurance coverage to part-time employees and their eligible dependents. They offer three different health insurance plans, depending on where you live. They don’t disclose the specifics of the coverage, so you’ll have to do some serious investigating before accepting a part-time job.

4. Southwest Airlines

Delta isn’t the only airline that offers health insurance for its part-time staff. Southwest does too, so it may be a norm in the airline industry.

Like Delta, Southwest is one of the major airlines, and operates at airports across the country. Their website gives no indication of how many hours you need to work to qualify for health insurance, but they do confirm it’s available. Again, make sure you look into the details before applying for a part-time job if health insurance is the main reason for doing so.

And once again, as an airline employee, you’ll enjoy generous travel benefits.

5. Lowe’s

Lowe’s is another company that has locations all across the country. In addition to the fact that they offer health insurance, this could be a real part-time job opportunity for someone with a background or interest in construction, home remodeling, or any of the trades.

Lowe’s health insurance includes prescription drug, dental and vision coverage. Benefits take effect within 31 days of starting, so this can be a real option if you’re looking for coverage fast. Like other companies on this list, they don’t indicate how many hours you need to work to qualify, so you’ll have to do some digging on that front.

Health insurance for part-timers looks like this:

6. Whole Foods

Whole Foods is another company that frequently makes lists of part-time jobs that provide health insurance. The company has nearly 500 stores across 44 states, so there’s an excellent chance there’s a location near you.

According to their website, you’re eligible for benefits if you work at least 20 hours per week, and have completed an undisclosed probationary period. They don’t indicate the specific type of coverage, but it seems to be dependent on location. You’ll have to do some investigating in the store where you apply.

7. Safeway

Safeway is one of the largest grocery store chains in the country. They operate more than 2,200 stores in 33 states. Their website indicates they offer coverage for part employees, but there’s also some indication that it varies by store location. They may offer the benefit in some states, but not in others. Or it may vary from one store to another. They’re a bit sketchy on the details, so once again you’ll have to do some investigating.

8. Costco

Costco is another company that frequently makes these lists. It’s generally nationwide as well, with more than 500 locations in 44 states. Coverage begins the first day of the second month after you’ve completed 450 eligible hours. You’re then required to average at least 23 hours per week to qualify for health insurance. The coverage includes your spouse, children, parents and even grandparents.

9. Citi Bank

It turns out your friendly neighborhood bank may be a prime source of part-time with health insurance. That includes some of the most prominent banks in the country.

Citi offers coverage for part-timers. You have to work a minimum of 20 hours per week, and you become eligible after 90 days of employment.

The downside is that Citi branches are concentrated in the largest metropolitan areas, so they may not be available in smaller cities. If so, try other banks in your area. It seems to be a common practice.

10. JP Morgan Chase

JP Morgan Chase has a health insurance arrangement for part-timers comparable to Citi. You’re required to work at least 20 hours per week, and there’s also a 90 day waiting period.

Plans are provided by CIGNA and United Healthcare, include dental and vision coverage, and are available for family members.

11. SunTrust Bank

SunTrust is a large regional bank, operating more than 1,400 branches in 11 southeastern states. They don’t indicate how many hours are required to get health insurance, but they do offer it to part-timers. They have different plans, and include prescription drug coverage. And as a bank, they also offer a health savings accounts (HSAs) to cover out-of-pocket expenses.

12. REI

If you’re not familiar with REI, there a company that sells sporting goods, camping gear, travel equipment and clothing. They have 154 retail stores in 36 states across the country. And they do offer part-time jobs that provide health insurance.

Their REI Flex Plan provides health insurance for workers averaging 20 or more hours per week. You can choose between several plans, and coverage extends to your dependents. The website indicates they pay most of the premium cost for the plan.

13. Aetna

Large insurance companies may be well worth a look for part-time jobs that provide health insurance. Aetna is an example. They provide health insurance for part-timers who work at least 20 hours per week. That also includes vision and dental coverage, as well as HSAs.

14. Navy Federal Credit Union

The OutOfYourRut list reports that credit unions are common sources of part-time jobs that provide health insurance. I did some light research to see if that’s true, and it absolutely is. In fact, I hit pay dirt on the first search.

Navy Federal Credit Union is the largest credit union in the country, and yes, they provide health insurance for part-timers. They list comprehensive medical coverage, catastrophic coverage and prescription drug benefits, with a choice of either a PPO or HMO, depending on location.

The website doesn’t give details as to how many hours you need to work, but 20 seems to be the standard among credit unions.

Apart from Navy Federal Credit Union, check with any credit union in your area to see if they have part-time jobs that provide health insurance. There’s an excellent chance they will.

Final Thoughts

If none of these tickle your fancy, you should also look into hospitals, county governments and colleges and universities. They commonly offer part-time jobs that provide health insurance.

In fact, it seems there are more part-time jobs with health insurance than we usually think. Check with any competitors of the companies on this list – banks, credit unions, retailers, airlines and insurance companies.

If one major employer in a field offers coverage for part-timers, there’s probably others.

Banking Services provided by The Bancorp Bank, Member FDIC. The Chime Visa® Debit Card is issued by The Bancorp Bank pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. and may be used everywhere Visa debit cards are accepted. Chime and The Bancorp Bank, neither endorse nor guarantee any of the information, recommendations, optional programs, products, or services advertised, offered by, or made available through the external website ("Products and Services") and disclaim any liability for any failure of the Products and Services.