Tag: ChimeIn

 

Want to Give Back? Here Are Some Ideas for Giving Tuesday

You’ve probably found yourself in this predicament: You want to do more to give back in your community, but the holidays can swallow up your time and savings.

Luckily, you can take advantage of the upcoming Giving Tuesday on November 27 to shake off some of that holiday guilt.  What, exactly, is Giving Tuesday? It’s a global movement, now in its seventh year, that encourages individuals and companies to donate their time and money to worthy causes and organizations.

The #GivingTuesday movement raised $274 million online with more than 150 countries participating in 2017. While this day may only come around once a year, the positive effects last a lot longer. Chime, for example, is participating in the Pledge 1% movement whereby businesses pledge to give back 1% of equity, profit, product, and/or employee time for their communities. Case in point: Chime volunteers assembled 1,300 boxes of non-perishables for the senior community in San Francisco.

Will you join us in making a difference? Take a look at 7 ways you can give back in honor of Giving Tuesday.

1. Shop Smarter

Torn between using your bank account to help humanity and buy gifts for your family? Good news! You don’t have to choose. You can purchase gifts that kick a portion of the price back to charities. For example, Uncommon Goods sells unique gifts from local artisans and gives one dollar of each purchase back to charity. For affordable options, just search the “under $25” gift section for gifts ranging from coffee blends to herb gardens to unusual toys.

2. Donate Money

Interested in giving money to local charities but not sure where to give? To start, think about how you’d best like to make a difference. For example, if you love books and want to spread literacy, a contribution to Worldreader helps fund digital book distribution. Or, if you want your hard-earned dough to help Hurricane Florence victims, The American Red Cross makes donating effortless.

Try forgoing a daily latte or fast food runs and instead donate the money. Your waistline will thank you too.

3. Volunteer

If you don’t have extra money to donate at this time, no worries. You can still make an impact by giving your time. Check your city’s website, the local library or community center to find out about upcoming volunteer opportunities.

Another pro tip: Search VolunteerMatch to find volunteer opportunities that fit your interests and talents. For example, computer pros can discover ways to put their tech skills to use, while animal lovers can volunteer to care for Fido while he waits for adoption.

4. Give Blood

While needles may make you squeamish, donating blood is an easy and impactful way to give back. The whole process takes less than an hour.

The American Red Cross reports that the U.S. needs blood every two seconds. One donation can potentially save three lives.

5. Be a Good Neighbor

Look around. Sometimes the greatest needs are right in front of you. For example, perhaps you can bring in trash cans for busy families or elderly neighbors. Or, ask a new mom in your apartment building if you can bring her a meal or babysit.

Don’t know your neighbors? Now might be a good time to become acquainted. Make a goal to bring a plate or package of cookies to one neighbor’s home and introduce yourself.

6. Small Acts of Kindness

This is an easy and inexpensive way to give back.

If your day starts with a morning coffee run, pay for the coffee for the person behind you in line. Here are a couple of other ideas: Leave a simple note saying, “You are amazing. Have a good day!” on someone’s car, or buy lunch for your co-worker who is too busy to eat.

While you’re at it, remember to look up from your routine to notice life around you and think about how you can make a small difference in someone’s day.

7. Be the Motivator

You don’t need to do #GivingTuesday alone. Recruit your friends, family, or co-workers to make the day more fun. Run a marathon for charity together. Serve food in a group at a local shelter. 

Helping out is contagious. When you motivate others to participate, you stay encouraged too. By getting together with friends or colleagues, you also get to catch up during the busy season and connect on a deeper level.

Why not chat about what’s new in your life while assembling necessities for those in need? Or get to know a co-worker better while wrapping presents for underprivileged children.

Why #GivingTuesday?

We get it: You are busy and stressed about the upcoming the holidays. How in the world are you supposed to find the extra time or funds to participate in #GivingTuesday? It’s not easy, but it will be worth it. Think of this globally-celebrated day as a way to take a breather from your to-do list.

And remember: Helping someone else is not only good for the community. It’s good for you. It allows you to take a pause in your daily life and experience the joy of a more connected world.

 

10 Stats You Should Know on Equal Pay Day

Equal Pay Day always falls during the second week of April to symbolize how much longer women have to work in order to earn what men earned by December 31, 2016. There’s no single cause for the pay gap, which means there’s no silver bullet to closing the gap. But we can start by getting educated on the issue and who it impacts.

1. Women earn 83% of what men earn

In 2017, women earned 82% of what men earned, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of median hourly earnings of both full- and part-time U.S. workers. The 18-percent difference between men’s and women’s earnings means that women are paid less than roughly $4 for every $5 paid to men.

According to the Gender Pay Inequality Report put out by the United States Congress, a woman working full-time earns $10,800 less per year than a man, based on median annual earnings. This disparity can add up to close to a half million dollars over a career.

2. The pay gap is even worse for mothers

According to the American Association of University Women, Mothers must work an extra 155 days to catch up to their male counterparts.

Women with children are often pushed out of the workplace due to a lack of sufficient parental leave policies and flexible schedules. Those who do stay in the workforce are subjected to the “motherhood penalty” with which we will lose 4 percent in lifetime earnings, a figure purely attributable to bias against working mothers.

3. The gender gap grows with age

Women today begin their careers earning almost as much as their male colleagues. Those between the ages of 18 and 24 earn approximately 88 percent of what their male counterparts earn. After 35, the median earnings for women are 74–82 percent of what men are paid. Men are also 85 percent more likely than women to be VPs or C-Suite Execs by mid-career.

4. Women of color are most affected

The pay gap affects all women regardless of age, background, or education, however, women of color are disproportionately affected. According to a report by the National Women’s Law Center, Black women earn, on average, only 63 cents for every dollar paid to a man, while Native and Latina women earn even less, at 58 cents and 54 cents respectively.

6. The financial industry has the worst pay gap

Women who work in highly paid fields such as finance, public service, and medicine feel the most economic pain from the pay gap. According to PayScale, finance and insurance showed the largest pay gap with women earning 29% less than men. Healthcare and social assistance had the fourth highest gap, even though women held 80% of the jobs in this industry, illustrating that even female-dominated sectors can have a gender pay gap.

7. Education doesn’t impact the gender pay gap

While advanced education can be a path to increased earnings, it does not appear to mitigate the gender pay gap.  At every level of academic achievement, women’s median earnings are less than men’s, and in some instances, the gender pay gap is larger at higher levels of education.

Women’s median earnings are lower at every level of education. In fact, women are often out-earned by men with less education: the typical woman with a graduate degree earns $5,000 less than the typical man with a bachelor’s degree.

8. The gender pay gap means more student debt for women

According to AAUW’s research report Graduating to a Pay Gap, between 2009 and 2012, men who graduated in the 2007–08 school year paid off an average of 44 percent of their student debt, while women in that group managed to pay off only 33 percent of their student debt. The gap in student loan repayment is even larger for black and Hispanic women with college degrees.

9. We’re still a long way off for pay equality

Although the gender pay gap in the United States has narrowed over time, if change continues at the same slow pace as it has done for the past fifty years, it will not close until 2059, according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.  Hispanic women will have to wait until 2248 and Black women will wait until 2124 for equal pay.

10. Despite less pay, women-led companies perform 3X better than the SP500

Quantopian, a Boston-based trading platform based on crowdsourced algorithms, pitted the performance of Fortune 1000 companies that had women CEOs between 2002 and 2014 against the S&P 500’s performance during that same period. The comparison showed that the 80 women CEOs during those 12 years produced equity returns 226% better than the S&P 500.

Conclusion

The impact of women in the workplace can be seen at a broader level as well. According to the Council of Economic Advisors, women’s increased participation in the paid labor force has been a major driver of economic growth in recent decades. In fact, they say the U.S. economy is $2 trillion bigger today than it would have been if women had not increased their participation and hours since 1970. That’s a lot of zeros! Imagine how much more our economy will grow when we close that gap once and for all.

 

Embrace Your Political Power By Rocking The Vote this Election

It’s not every day we’re given the chance to help shape the direction of our country. For the first time ever, the number of Millennials eligible to vote (69.2 million) matches that of the Baby Boomer generation (69.7 million).

Although as a group we now have the greatest political power, we are also the least likely to vote—an ironic fact since the majority of our Founding Fathers was under the age of 40 when the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776. In fact, Thomas Jefferson was 33, Millennial age, when he drafted the historic document that birthed our nation.

Coming of age during the financial crisis of 2008, with student loan debt that has topped $1.3 trillion, it’s not surprising that we’re frustrated with government. A Pew Research Center study found over two-thirds of Millennials believe politicians are working for self-gain and are not adhering to our top concerns: student debt, job opportunity, and environmental issues.

When we asked Millennials in their junior and senior year of college to rank the most important issues in this presidential race, job creation topped the list followed by fixing health care, protecting the rights of women, and making college affordable.

We clearly have issues we’re passionate about, yet a recent Harvard survey stated only 7% of Millennials reported participating in a government, political or issue-related organization during the past year.

Still, that doesn’t mean we aren’t active in our communities. The same survey also showed one-third of Millennials participate in community service. We have a clear desire to make a difference, and now we have the power to make a real impact.

If this election cycle has taught us anything, it’s that it won’t be decided by corporations, the elite, or special interests. It will be decided by millions of people making their voices heard at the ballot box. From Donald Trump riding a wave of populist support to the nomination to Bernie Sander’s famous $27 average donation, grassroots support, and individual contributions have helped these candidates earn credibility and reshape the course of the 2016 presidential election.

Just as we’ve disrupted technology, creating social and mobile platforms that have completely reinvented the way we all communicate, Millennials have the opportunity to use our voices, our time, our influence, and our dollars to prioritize the issues we care about.

The Republican National Convention will be held July 18-21st and the Democratic National Convention is July 25-28th. It’s time to tune in, get informed, and take action! Regardless of your party affiliation, Chime and Rock the Vote want you to start getting involved in this election.

So, where should you start? First, register to vote. You’ll be surprised how easy it is. Don’t believe us? Watch President Obama share 5 things that are harder than registering to vote.

Next, donate to organizations that are helping register, educate, and engage other Millennials. When you make a donation of $25 or more with your Chime card to Rock the Vote, Chime will now give you $5.00 back!

It’s time to make history. Let Chime help you do it.

 

5 Ways to #ChimeIn for Hunger This Holiday Season

Two months ago Chime called attention to the staggering problem of food insecurity in America with our Chime In for Hunger campaign in support of  Feeding America. Many of our members responded to the call and we want to thank those who contributed.

As we gather together this holiday season to celebrate with traditions of food, gift giving, and time with friends and family, our thoughts are with those struggling to get by or put food on the table. There are close to 49 million Americans living in food-insecure households, including 32.8 million adults and 15.3 million children. These statistics are truly hard to stomach, particularly this time of year. That’s why we’re sharing a few tips on how you can make a difference, starting with your local community.

1. Donate your time.

  • Join a local gleaning group. Gleaning groups assist with picking fruit and vegetable crops that would otherwise go to waste. Volunteering with a gleaning group is a great way to make a difference while affording you the opportunity to learn about local agriculture.
  • Volunteer at a food bank in your area. Millions of families depend on meals provided through local food banks and pantries, and those facilities rely on volunteers to help sort, bag and distribute food.

Some of our team members here at Chime recently lent a hand at the San Francisco Food Bank. In just a few hours our volunteer group packaged 660 boxes of pears and 500 pounds of rice for distribution to various partners and pantries across local counties. 

2. Donate money.

  • Food banks, as well as other non-profit organizations that fight hunger, rely heavily on grants and cash donations. Food banks buy food in bulk and at discounted rates, so a donation of $1 can purchase $20 worth of food for a family in need.  You can donate directly to your local food bank, or through organizations such as Feeding America.

3. Reduce waste through recovery and donation.

  • Hosting a party? Donate the leftover food. Work with your school to ensure that unused food is bequeathed to a pantry or food bank.
  • Hire a gleaning group to yield the fruit on your land and give the harvest to a local food bank.

4. Host a food drive.

  • Consider coordinating a food drive and requesting participants donate food or a few dollars which nonprofits can use to buy food at an exponential discount.

5. Raise awareness.
The easiest way to do your part in solving the problem of food insecurity is to bring the issue into the mainstream. You can Chime In For Hunger in one of these simple ways:

  • Host a charitable dinner at your school or home to promote discussions about solving poverty and hunger issues.
  • Share this list with friends and family and ask them to join forces so you can Chime in for Hunger together.

No matter how you choose to help, any contribution of your time and resources can make a difference for those less fortunate. Tell us how you plan to Chime in for Hunger in the comments.

 

#ChimeIn for Education

If there’s one cause that hits close to home for all of us, it’s education. More and more, public schools in the U.S. are falling short when it comes to providing basic supplies. Many students in our country today do not have the books they need to develop a love of reading or the equipment needed to keep high school athletics alive.

This month, we’re highlighting DonorsChoose.org, an organization that crowdsources funding for classroom supplies and project. Think Kickstarter meets the PTA.

Through DonorsChoose, public school teachers from all across America create classroom project requests and allow donors to give any amount. You also have the option to tell others why you gave to a specific project and, for an extra tug on your heart, the students will send you handwritten thank you letters. There’s no better way to make a difference directly where it’s needed the most.

Helping a classroom grow and seeing how excited the students are about learning will bring you back to your happiest first days back to school. And, as if you need any more incentive, we’ll give you $5.00 back when you donate $25.00 or more to DonorsChoose.org in September.

Together, we can all help make a difference through an investment that will pay back for years to come.

 

Let’s #ChimeIn for Nepal

Weeks after the earthquake hit, Nepal still needs our help.

Though it’s easy for our attention to shift with the latest news cycle, Nepal still needs our help. New reports continue to shed light on the immense impact of the 7.8 magnitude earthquake. Up to 90 percent of clinics and schools have been destroyed, and the need there is growing.

Today we’re adding our support to the cause by encouraging Chime members to donate by giving them more spending power when they donate to UNICEF using Chime this month. If you’re considering contributing to the relief effort, whether you’re a Chime member or not, it’s important to do your homework on how best to help. A common tip is to avoid sending physical goods, and instead donate to organizations that you can trust. A great resource is Charity Navigator which has a helpful guide to giving in times of crisis as well as a list of current, four-star rated organizations such as UNICEF that allow donors to designate their contribution specifically to the relief effort in Nepal.

Chime’s mobile banking app is designed for a generation of consumers looking for a better way of banking, and one that also cares about giving back. A 2014 Millennial Impact Report shows that 87 percent of millennials gave to non-profits last year. They’re 80 million strong with more than $200 billion in annual spending power. At Chime, we’re dedicated to helping our members get more out of every dollar they earn and spend, and today we’re hopeful that we can help turn that spending power into spending that makes a difference.

Let’s #ChimeIn together for Nepal.

Chris Britt
Chime Co-founder & CEO

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